Listicle / review

Tess’s Top 10 Reads of 2014

#10 – Cuckoo Song by Frances Hardinge

 

Genre: Urban Fantasy / Horror
Pages: 409
Published: 2014 (Pan MacMillan)

■■■■■■■■■_Concept
■■■■■■■■■■_World building
■■■■■■■■■■_Plot
■■■■■■■■■■_Writing
■■■■■■■■■■_Protagonist
■■■■■■■■■■_Character development

_
_

“The plot and fantasy world was just outstanding. Though it definitely had a Gaiman vibe – which I would describe as a very “alternative and dark fairy tale” – it’s the most original mid-fantasy I have read in a long time. Because of that I was continuously blown away by new magical creatures, aspects and ideas. Due to its originality I could never predict where the plot was going to go and what would happen to these characters I had grown really fond of.”
Picture1

#9 – The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender by Leslye Walton

 

Genre: Urban Fantasy / YA
Pages: 301
Published: 2014 (Candlewick Press)

■■■■■■■■■■_Concept
■■■■■■■■■■_World building
■■■■■■■■■■_Plot
■■■■■■■■■■_Writing
■■■■■■■■■■_Protagonist
■■■■■■■■■■_Character development

_
_

“It is, in essence, a story about a family. A family that just happens to be a little bit magical. The story is intended to explore the different sides and angles of love, precisely by not writing about love; just writing about life, and the love that we can find in between. Loved it.”

#8 – The Mad Scientist’s Daughter by Cassandra Rose Clarke

 

Genre: Sci-Fi / Romance
Pages: 391
Published: 2013 (Angry Robot)

■■■■■■■■■■_Concept
■■■■■■■■■■_World building
■■■■■■■■■■_Plot
■■■■■■■■■■_Writing
■■■■■■■■■■_Protagonist
■■■■■■■■■■_Character development

_
_

“Read it, enjoy it, think about it. Then get your friends to read it and start an in-depth Facebook discussion about the true meaning of consciousness. And let me know if you high-fived your Kindle at any point.”
Picture1

#7 – The Martian by Andy Weir

 

Genre: Sci-Fi
Pages: 369
Published: 2014 (Ebury Digital)

■■■■■■■■■■_Concept
■■■■■■■■■■_World building
■■■■■■■■■■_Plot
■■■■■■■■■■_Writing
■■■■■■■■■_Protagonist
■■■■■■■■■■_Character development

_
_

“Hardcore survivalism? Interesting and different location? High stakes, excitement, a protagonist that makes the Book Boyfriend list? OH YES.”

Picture1

#6 – In The After by Demitria Lunetta

 

Genre: Dystopia / Zombies
Pages: 480
Published: 2014 (HarperTeen)

■■■■■■■■■■_Concept
■■■■■■■■■■_World building
■■■■■■■■■■_Plot
■■■■■■■■■■_Writing
■■■■■■■■■■_Protagonist
■■■■■■■■■■_Character development

_
_

“Made of win. I didn’t expect to enjoy this so much, but the story was everything I wanted. It’s probably the first book I’ve ever read where I could predict what was going to happen, but everything was still so suspenseful and well-written it made me forget that I had, in fact, predicted the happenings. The sequel In The End is equally enjoyable.”

#5 – Lirael by Garth Nix

 

Genre: Fantasy / YA
Pages: 527
Published: 2004 (Harper Collins)

■■■■■■■■■■_Concept
■■■■■■■■■_World building
■■■■■■■■■■_Plot
■■■■■■■■■■_Writing
■■■■■■■■■■_Protagonist
■■■■■■■■■■_Character development

_
_

“My favourite book of Garth Nix’s epic Old Kingdom series (not that I’ve read them all yet!). This fantasy world is one of the best out there; so different and interesting, it’s the best part of the books for me.”

#4 – Gates of Thread and Stone by Lori M. Lee

 

Genre: Fantasy / YA
Pages: 335
Published: 2014 (Skyscape)

■■■■■■■■■_Concept
■■■■■■■■■■_World building
■■■■■■■■■■_Plot
■■■■■■■■■■_Writing
■■■■■■■■■■_Protagonist
■■■■■■■■■■_Character development

_
_

Gates of Thread and Stone is truly a quality read.I’d recommend it for anyone who loves a fairly dark and clever YA read. Someone who wants an original concept. Someone who maybe read The Winner’s Curse earlier this year and wants the same level of world-building or similar kind of romance. With a much better plot, though. GOD, ALL OF THAT PLOT.”

Picture1

#3 – Crushed by Eliza Crewe

 

Genre: Urban Fantasy / YA
Pages: 271
Published: 2014 (Strange Chemistry)

■■■■■■■■■_Concept
■■■■■■■■■■_World building
■■■■■■■■■■_Plot
■■■■■■■■■■_Writing
■■■■■■■■■■_Protagonist
■■■■■■■■■■_Character development

_
_

“It is rare, like a diamond in the rough, but it exists; a sequel that is better than the first book. I loved every minute: a fantastic anti-hero, equally wonderful secondary characters, a different and fast-paced plot with a ton of comedy and emotional turmoil.  I could fault Crushed if I tried enough, but I don’t need or want to. Actually you know what, I can fault it: it was over too soon.”

Picture1

#2 – Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie

 

Genre: Fantasy
Pages: 207
Published: 1911 (Hodder & Stoughton)

■■■■■■■■■■_Concept
■■■■■■■■■■_World building
■■■■■■■■■■_Plot
■■■■■■■■■■_Writing
■■■■■■■■■_Protagonist
■■■■■■■■■■_Character development

_
_

“It has become one of my most beloved classics, I found it far superior than any Hollywood or Disney adaption I’ve seen, it’s just incredible. It’s fantastically written: creative, clever and very funny. I didn’t expect the funnies, to be honest. Peter Pan is one of the most exciting and fascinating characters in literature, and all the rest of them are a joy to read about too. This book was everything the Disney film told me it would be, and bags more to boot.”

#1 – Shatter Me by Tahereh Mafi

 

Genre: Sci-Fi / YA
Pages: 421
Published: 2014 (Harper Collins)

■■■■■■■■■■_Concept
■■■■■■■■■■_World building
■■■■■■■■■■_Plot
■■■■■■■■■_Writing
■■■■■■■■■■_Protagonist
■■■■■■■■■■_Character development

_
_

“The Shatter Me trilogy is the only series I have properly devoured this year. It’s not something I would easily recommend, as I had a lot of problems with it, but my love for the protagonist was so strong it overrode everything else. The series taught me a lot, and it will always stick with me. Not for the plot, the world-building, or any form of plausible sci-fi element which was not of abundance in this, but for a character I connected to more strongly than any other, an immense realism of humanity, and a heart-wrenching test of endurance.”

Picture1

See you in 2015! x

Advertisements

One thought on “Tess’s Top 10 Reads of 2014

Talk to me

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s